Vermont Humanities

Woman speaking with hand over heart beside statue
Woman speaking with hand over heart beside statue

Using the humanities, we connect with people across Vermont to create just, vibrant, and resilient communities and to inspire a lifelong love of learning.

three people in a row with exclamation marks above their heads

Attend

Come enjoy 400+ humanities
events held across Vermont.

upcoming events

orange eye with lines rising above the illustration

Watch

Miss an event or discussion? Watch a recording on your
own time.

recorded events

a green ear with a jagged line going from left to right

Listen

Dive into our two humanities podcasts to engage and learn about new perspectives.

discover podcasts

a purple line illustration of an old-fashioned school building

Book

Bring a speaker or event to your library, community, or school.

find out how

Upcoming Events

Colorful ABC building blocks
Digital Event

Foundations of Educational Philosophy and Literacy Development

This is a statewide training, but priority will be given to educators who live and/or work in Charlotte, Hinesburg, and Shelburne. This foundational literacy training will now be required before enrollment in subsequent Never Too Early trainings.

Live Event

PJC Author & Artist Series: Greg Guma

Join the Peace & Justice Center Thursday, August 11 from 6-7pm for a conversation with Greg Guma, author of Restless Spirits and Popular Movements: A Vermont History. This is an in-person event that will be held at Waterfront Park in Burlington across from the Echo Center.

Image of Vermont field in winter
Live Event

Vermont, 1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816

1816 has long been known as the year without summer. Vermonters still call it “1800 and Froze to Death,” a year of frosts every month, dark skies, and mysterious lights that caused a widespread belief that a higher power was displeased. In this talk, historian Howard Coffin includes scores of anecdotes on the dark year of failed crops, scarce food, and religious revival.

book folded into a heart with orange sunset over water in the background
Digital Event

Refresh, Restore, Renew – A time to ask: “What is our story going forward?”

A storytelling invitation – Come together to collect, create, and curate to answer this question: What is our story going forward, for ourselves and our organizations? This interactive, 2-hour virtual workshop will expand your storytelling tools and techniques; revive your current skills through new perspective; and reinvigorate your organization through storytelling team building.

book folded into a heart with orange sunset over water in the background
Digital Event

Refresh, Restore, Renew – A time to ask: “What is our story going forward?”

A storytelling invitation – Come together to collect, create, and curate to answer this question: What is our story going forward, for ourselves and our organizations? This interactive, 2-hour virtual workshop will expand your storytelling tools and techniques; revive your current skills through new perspective; and reinvigorate your organization through storytelling team building.

Image of sharpshooters taking aim
Live Event

Vermont’s Remarkable Sharpshooters

Vermont sent far more sharpshooters to the Union armies than any other state, on a per capita basis. Sharpshooters from this state played a little-known but major role at Gettysburg. Historian Howard Coffin will discuss his recent research into this little-recognized group and consider the reasons why Vermont may have been so well-represented in this elite group of marksmen.

Wall with poster that says "Post No Hate"
Live Event

Must Free Speech Endure Hate Speech?

The First Amendment prevents Congress from passing any laws that abridge the freedom of speech. But what does that actually mean? In this presentation, professor Meg Mott considers the history of speech laws in the United States, how states and municipalities have tried to curb offensive speech, and how the Supreme Court has ruled on those efforts.

Image of beekeeper with hive
Live Event

Bees Besieged: A History of Beekeeping

Bill Mares, writer, and a beekeeper for 45 years, will tell of the origins and evolution of beekeeping, sometimes referred to as “farming for intellectuals,” with a particular emphasis on his new book, with Ross Conrad, and others, “The Land of Milk and Honey, a History of Beekeeping in Vermont.”

Carol Potter, with short gray hair and dark tortoiseshell glasses
Live Event

Carol Potter: Words in the Woods

Carol Potter is a teacher, editor, and author of five books of poetry. Some Slow Bees won the Field Poetry Prize from Oberlin College Press in 2014. Her poems have been published in The American Poetry Review, Poetry, The Green Mountains Review, The Kenyon Review, among others.

Image of old postcard of the Connecticut River
Live Event

400 Miles Down the Connecticut River

New England’s longest river, the Connecticut, is rich in history. Michael Tougias, author of fourteen books about New England, offers a narrated slide presentation that takes the viewer down the entire 410 miles of the river, discussing history from the days of loggers, Indian Wars, steamships, and canals.

Image of drawing of industrialists atop boat
Live Event

Gilded Age: Then and Now

This series starts with the 1893 Columbian Exposition and continues on through the Gilded Age. Portrayals of inventors, entrepreneurs, artists and lawyers include Henry James, Stanford White, Clarence Darrow, George Westinghouse, Thomas Edison, D.W. Griffiths and detective William Burns. Three novels and a narrative history illustrate that spectacular time period in ways that in turn illuminate our own era.

Colorful ABC building blocks
Digital Event

Foundations of Educational Philosophy and Literacy Development

This is a statewide training, but priority will be given to educators who live and/or work in Charlotte, Hinesburg, and Shelburne. This foundational literacy training will now be required before enrollment in subsequent Never Too Early trainings.

See All Upcoming Events

We recently gave a $5000 project grant to the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction to print and distribute a comic to schools and literacy organizations throughout Vermont.

How We Read, A Graphic Guide To Literacy will help kids experience the joy of reading and overcome the stigma of struggling to read.

Learn more about our Project Grants

Image courtesy Center for Cartoon Studies

Cartoon block with a girl reading on colorful grass surrounded by flowers

Our Programs

Vermont Humanities has developed a broad range of programs that serves Vermonters of all ages and backgrounds. In 2021, 31,365 people took part in 562 activities hosted by us or by our community partners.

Learn More about Our Programs

The Anne Commire Fund for Women in the Humanities supports projects that focus on women writers. Anne (at far left) is shown with the cast of her play “Melody Sisters” in 1984.

The fund was created through a legacy gift of $125,000 from Anne’s estate, one of the largest individual gifts ever made to Vermont Humanities.

Learn more about this gift

Support Our Work

By giving to Vermont Humanities, you support education for people of all ages through early literacy programs, Humanities Camps for middle-school children, and programs held in libraries, community centers, schools, and correctional facilities.

Learn More about Supporting Us

Vermont Humanities*** January 13, 2015