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Windsor

Last Updated 4/11/2014 10:03:54 AM

Vermont Humanities Events 

Windsor

Through Fall 2014— Covered Bridges of Woodstock Exhibit. Grant Event. The exhibit celebrates Woodstock's covered bridges past and present on the occasion of the Taftsville bridge re-opening. Visit www.woodstockhistorical. org or call for hours. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

April 16 — Book Discussion: March by Geraldine Brooks, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. Part of the Retellings series. These novels all re-imagine classics works of fiction, retelling them from a different character's persepective. Led by Rachael Cohen. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

April 23 — Vermont Prepares: Disaster Planning for Archival Records. Grant Event. This day-long workshop offered by the Northeast Document Conservation Center is designed for staff at institutions that maintain historical records. Participants will learn to develop emergency plans for their institutions. $25, pre-registration required at http://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/vermont-program. Hosted by the Vermont Historical Records Advisory Board and supported by a VHC grant. Springfield, River Valley Technical Center, 303 South St, 303 South St. Kim O'Leary, (978) 470 -1010 x226, koleary@nedcc.org.

May 3 — Duty’s Faithful Child: A Visit with Louisa May Alcott. Famous as the author of Little Women and other books for young people, Louisa May Alcott was herself a fascinating character. Her life was formed in the intellectual and philosophical hotbed of 19th-century Concord, Massachusetts, home of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and her own philosopher father, Amos Bronson Alcott. Jeanne Austin draws on the life and writings of this remarkable woman, shaping them into an exciting and educational living history experience. Hosted by the General Federation of Women's Clubs of Vermont. Ludlow, Okemo Valley Golf Club, 89 Fox Ln, 1:30 pm. Midge Tucker, (802) 672-3086.

May 7 — The History of Herbal Medicine in America. Expert herbalist Rosemary Gladstar examines the early history of herbalism in America and how herbs play a role in healthcare today.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Congregational Church, 15 Church St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

May 18 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Hartland Historical Society. Hartland Public Library, 153 Route 5, 2:00 pm. Carol Mowry, (802) 436-3383.

June 4 — The Six Wives of Henry VIII. Author and scholar Kavita Finn examines the lives of Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Katherine Howard, and Katherine Parr—their backgrounds, their marriages to the king, and how they have been depicted both during their time and today.A First Wednesdays lecture (rescheduled from February 5). Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Congregational Church, 15 Church St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

June 10 — Arming the Union: Vermont Gunmakers and the Technology that Shaped America. During the Civil War, the Union army fielded more than two million men, most of them armed with newlymade, highly accurate rifles. In this illustrated lecture, historian and museum curator Carrie Brown explores the critical role that Windsor, Vermont, played in producing technology that won the war and changed American life and popular culture even after the war ended. Hosted by the Green Mountain Civil War Roundtable. White River Junction, Hotel Coolidge, 39 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Jack Anderson, (802) 457-2398.

June 23 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock Historical Society, 26 Elm St, 7:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

June 23 — Book Discussion: Black Robe by Brian Moore. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110-mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

July 6 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. Plymouth, President Calvin Coolidge Museum & Education Center, 3780 Route 100A, 2:00 pm. William Jenney, (802) 672-3773.

July 14 — Book Discussion: White Devil: A True Story of War, Savagery, and Vengeance in Colonial America by Stephen Brumwell. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110- mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

August 9 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. Plymouth, President Calvin Coolidge Museum & Education Center, 3780 Route 100A, 2:00 pm. William Jenney, (802) 672-3773.

August 11 — Book Discussion: Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England by William Cronon. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110- mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

October 12 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St, 2:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

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