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Chittenden

Last Updated 4/17/2014 11:58:03 AM

Vermont Humanities Events  

Chittenden

April 23 — Book Discussion: Sizwe’s Test: A Young Man’s Journey Through Africa’s AIDS Epidemic by Jonny Steinberg. Part of the Understanding Post-Colonial Africa series. What many Americans know about contemporary Africa can be summed up in headlines about bloody civil wars and corrupt dictators, child soldiers and “lost boys,” devastating disease, extreme poverty, and unsettling cultural practices. But the issues behind these headlines are far more complex than the popular press can portray. These four books help to introduce post-colonial Africa to the novice and explore some of the continent’s crises in greater depth—including the West’s complicity in them. Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise J Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

April 28 — Arming the Union: Vermont Gunmakers and the Technology that Shaped America. During the Civil War, the Union army fielded more than two million men, most of them armed with newly made, highly accurate rifles. In this illustrated lecture, historian and museum curator Carrie Brown explores the critical role that Windsor, Vermont, played in producing technology that won the war and changed American life and popular culture even after the war ended. Hosted by the Milton Public Library. Milton Public Library, 39 Bombardier Rd, 6:30 pm. MaryBeth Peterson, (802) 893-4644.

May 3 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Deborah Rawson Memorial Library. Jericho, Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 8 River Rd, 2:00 pm. Holly Hall, (802) 899-4962.

May 7 — The Transcontinental Railroad: America’s Greatest Adventure. Author Martin Sandler describes the extraordinary challenges of building an iron road 1800 miles through mountains, over prairies, and across deserts—all by hand—and discusses how “the greatest public work that mortal man has ever yet accomplished” forever changed the nation.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Penelope Pillsbury, (802) 878-6957.

May 7 — Poetry Adventure. A Vermont Reads Event. Join SBHS students and community members for a discussion of poems from Poetry 180 led by English teacher Joyce Sheehey. You don't have to read all the poems in the book to participate! Copies of the anthology are available to borrow from the library. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Louise Murphy, (802) 652 -7480.

May 16 — Vermont Prepares: Disaster Planning for Archival Records. Grant Event. This day-long workshop offered by the Northeast Document Conservation Center is designed for staff at institutions that maintain historical records. Participants will learn to develop emergency plans for their institutions. $25, pre-registration required at http://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/vermont-program. Hosted by the Vermont Historical Records Advisory Board and supported by a VHC grant. Shelburne Town Hall, 5376 Shelburne Rd. Kim O'Leary, (978) 470 -1010 x226, koleary@nedcc.org.

May 28 — Book Discussion: What is the What by Dave Eggers. Part of the Understanding Post-Colonial Africa series. What many Americans know about contemporary Africa can be summed up in headlines about bloody civil wars and corrupt dictators, child soldiers and “lost boys,” devastating disease, extreme poverty, and unsettling cultural practices. But the issues behind these headlines are far more complex than the popular press can portray. These four books help to introduce post-colonial Africa to the novice and explore some of the continent’s crises in greater depth—including the West’s complicity in them. Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise J Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

June 5 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5100. Must R.S.V.P.

June 16 — Book Discussion: Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

June 25 — Book Discussion: Zenzele: A Letter for My Daughter by J. Nozipo Maraire. Part of the Understanding Post-Colonial Africa series. What many Americans know about contemporary Africa can be summed up in headlines about bloody civil wars and corrupt dictators, child soldiers and “lost boys,” devastating disease, extreme poverty, and unsettling cultural practices. But the issues behind these headlines are far more complex than the popular press can portray. These four books help to introduce post-colonial Africa to the novice and explore some of the continent’s crises in greater depth—including the West’s complicity in them. Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise J Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

July 21 — Book Discussion: Empire Falls by Richard Russo. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

August 18 — Book Discussion: What Work Is by Philip Levine. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

September 3 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

September 15 — Book Discussion: The Cliff Walk: A Memoir of a Job Lost and a Life Found by Don Snyder. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

September 15 — Anne Frank’s Neighbors: What Did They Do? . Although Anne Frank’s Diary is the most widely read nonfiction book in the world after the Bible, little attention has been paid to her neighbors—the people who lived alongside the Jewish population as persecution intensified. Mary Fillmore examines the choices they faced and the decisions they made in the face of those choices. Why did some people ignore the situation, while others felt compelled to resist? What can we learn from them as we face the humanitarian crises of our own time? Hosted by the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library. Williston, Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Ln, 6:00 pm. Kathy DeLuca, (802) 878-4918.

October 1 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

November 14–15 — VHC 2014 Fall Conference: A Fire Never Extinguished: How America’s Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America. Many of the issues associated with the Civil War resonate today—in Vermont and throughout the nation. VHC’s fall conference (five months before the end of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War) will examine the influence that the War has had and continues to have, and will seek to identify lessons vital to American democracy that still can be learned from the War and its aftermath as we continue to build “a more perfect union” in the twenty-first century. Presented in collaboration with the Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. More details. Burlington, University of Vermont, Dudley H. Davis Center. Max Matthews, (802) 262-2626 x304.

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