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Chittenden

Last Updated 9/24/2014 12:20:36 PM

Vermont Humanities Events  

Chittenden

Through November 29 — Dance at Bennington College: 80 Years of Moving Through. Grant Event. A gallery exhibition of photographs from the 1930s to the present, drawn from the dance archives of Bennington College. Open Saturdays 11 am to 4 pm. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts and supported by a VHC grant. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St. Nancy Abbott-Hourigan, (802) 652-4505.

October 1 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

October 1 — Rumi, A Soul on Fire. Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine reads and discusses Rumi, one of the greatest and most widely read of spiritual poets.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

October 5 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie. Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Richmond Free Library. Richmond Free Library, 201 Bridge St, 4:00 pm. Wendy de Forest, (802) 434-3036.

October 6 — Book Discussion: Empire Falls by Richard Russo. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

October 6 — Book Discussion: Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper by Harriet Chessman. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

October 8 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Dorothy Tod. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5107.

October 15 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264 -5107.

October 16 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Viktor Ullmann. Grant Event. Of the many musicians who were interned at Theresienstadt concentration camp, Ullmann had had the most distinguished career at the time of his incarceration. He became mentor to other imprisoned composers, produced performances of new music, performed and served as music critic. He continued to compose under horrendous circumstances until his life was cut short in Auschwitz. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

October 17 — Classic Films of the 1950s. The 1950s were a fascinating time for Hollywood films. Several directors who began their careers in the silent era (Wilder, Hitchcock, Wyler) were in their prime; the studio system was in decline and independent films were gaining a foothold. New stars such as Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, James Dean, and Audrey Hepburn were making their mark; vital issues of the time such as juvenile delinquency, conformity, and racial attitudes were addressed, however timidly, while the shadow of the Hollywood blacklist loomed. Rick Winston will show clips from several acclaimed films of various genres from that era and discuss their significance. Hosted by the Carpenter-Carse Library. Hinesburg, Carpenter-Carse Library, 69 Ballards-Corners, 7:00 pm. Jane Racer, (802) 482-2878.

October 22 — Book Discussion: The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

October 22 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Kenneth Peck. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264 -5107.

October 27 — Book Discussion: Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

October 27 — Cold War on Film. Grant Event. In recognition of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall, historian and producer Taylor Downing will discuss the making of the Turner Cold War series, specifically focusing on the Fall of the Berlin Wall episode which will be screened as part of the presentation. Hosted by the Vermont International Film Foundation. Burlington, Champlain College, Perry Hall Room 240, 251 S Willard St, 7:00 pm. Orly Yadin, (802) 660 -2600.

October 29 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264 -5107.

October 31–November 1 — Look Back, Dance Forward: Tales of Home. Grant Event.This two-evening program stars Faustin Linyekula of Congo (October 31) in his acclaimed solo, Le Cargo, and Panaibra Gabriel Canda of Mozambique (November 1) in his expressive duet, Time and Spaces: The Marrabenta Solos, with live music by guitarist Jorge Domingos. In both pieces, the artists grapple with the complex histories of their countries by re-igniting memories of and experiences with their fathers. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Burlington, FlynnSpace, 153 Main St, 8:00 pm both evenings. Fee for performances, tickets at flynntix.org. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 3 — Book Discussion: What Work Is by Philip Levine. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

November 5 — The Marshall Plan Revisited. Mark A. Stoler, editor of George Marshall’s papers and UVM professor emeritus, examines the Marshall Plan of the late 1940s and early 1950s, considered one of the most successful programs in the history of American foreign relations.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

November 5 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Kenneth Peck. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr,  3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5107.

November 6 — Steve Paxton Pre- Performance Discussion. Grant Event. Pre-performance discussion with Stowe-based choreographer Polly Motley and dancer Steve Paxton. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St, 6:00 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 6 — Jurij Konjar/Steve Paxton. Grant Event. Postmodern pioneer Steve Paxton transformed dance vocabulary through improvisational work with Judson Dance Theatre and Grand Union. In this performance of Paxton’s 1983 work, Bound, Slovenian dancer Jurij Konjar performs the solo dance piece as taught to him by the choreographer. With formal training in Judo, Konjar is an ideal performer for Paxton’s work inspired by the concepts of gravity and momentum. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Fee for performance, tickets at flynntix.org. Burlington, FlynnSpace, 153 Main St, 7:30 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 10 — Book Discussion: La Tour Dreams of the Wolf Girl by David Huddle. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

November 12 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Dorothy Tod. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5107.

November 14–15 — VHC 2014 Fall Conference: A Fire Never Extinguished: How the Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America. Many of the issues associated with the Civil War resonate today—in Vermont and throughout the nation. VHC’s fall conference (five months before the end of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War) will examine the influence that the War has had and continues to have, and will seek to identify lessons vital to American democracy that still can be learned from the War and its aftermath as we continue to build “a more perfect union” in the twenty-first century. Presented in collaboration with the Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission and the National Park Service. More details. Burlington, University of Vermont, Dudley H. Davis Center. Max Matthews, (802) 262-2626 x304.

November 15 — An Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance. Grant Event. Philadelphia-based dancer and choreographer Raphael Xavier combines breakdancing and spoken word to create this evening-length autobiographical work. Based on 30 years of experience in hip-hop dance, The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance sets street dance choreography to a conversational monologue that “captivates with the impassioned lyrical delivery of a hip-hop artist” (Philadelphia Inquirer). By deconstructing Xavier’s lyrics and breakdancing technique, this group ensemble performance takes audiences on an artistic journey defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Fee for performance, tickets at flynntix.org. Burlington, FlynnSpace, 153 Main St, 8:00 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 21 — Martha Graham Dance Company Pre-Performance Discussion. Grant Event. Pre-performance conversation with Janet Elber, artistic director of the Martha Graham Dance Company, and Flynn Executive Director John Killacky. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St, 6:30 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 21 — Martha Graham Dance Company. Grant Event. Martha Graham’s influence on modern dance has been compared to Picasso’s influence on art or Stravinsky’s on music. Graham revolutionized dance, lighting, stage designing, costuming, and music; today, her company is one of the most revered modern dance troupes in the world, called “one of the seven wonders of the artistic universe” by the Los Angeles Times. For this performance, the company performs a new piece by Andonis Foniadakis titled Echo, Diversion of Angels (1948), Errand into the Maze (1947), and an 85th anniversary recital of Graham’s famous solo work, Lamentation Variations. Graham’s choreography remains “a true, living American document” (New York Times). Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Fee for performance, tickets at flynntix.org. Burlington, Flynn MainStage, 153 Main St, 8:00 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

December 3 — Presidential Term Limits: The History of a Bad Idea. UVM professor emeritus Frank Bryan argues that America’s adoption of presidential term limits not only weakened the Presidency, but also perhaps the Republic itself.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

December 3 — Book Discussion: Berlin Stories by Christopher Isherwood. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

December 4 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Tomas Luis de Victoria. Grant Event. Victoria, the most famous Spanish composer of the late Renaissance period, studied music in Rome, possibly with Palestrina. He devoted himself exclusively to sacred vocal music yet was influenced by secular madrigalists such as Marenzio. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

December 8 — Book Discussion: Frida by Barbara Mujica. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982. 

December 8 — Book Discussion: The Cliff Walk: A Memoir of a Job Lost and a Life Found by Don Snyder. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

2015

January 14 — What’s the Use of Stories That Aren’t Even True? Salman Rushdie, author of VHC's 2015 Vermont Reads Book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, talks about the importance of storytelling. A First Wednesdays lecture. Presented with the Office of the President, University of Vermont. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Burlington, Ira Allen Chapel, 26 University Ter, 5:00 pm. Max Matthews, (802) 262-1355.

January 15 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Francesco Maria Veracini. Grant Event. Veracini came from a family of violinists in Florence. His 18th-century career took him to Dresden and London as violinist, conductor and composer. His playing was virtuosic, but his arrogant personality and eccentric behavior often got him into trouble. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

February 4 — Book Discussion: Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

February 4 — Delicious to the Ear: The Inspiring Voice of Maya Angelou. Before she was a revered poet, memoirist, and activist, Maya Angelou was mute for five years as a child. UVM professor Emily Bernard explains how poetry awakened Angelou’s voice, which transformed a history of trauma into inspiration and beauty.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

February 19 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Giuseppe Verdi. Grant Event. Verdi came from a small Italian village to become his country’s most revered composer as well as a national hero. His long life spanning most of the 19th century resulted in 28 operas of which many, such as Tosca, Rigoletto, Otello and Aida, are staples of opera houses worldwide. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

March 4 — Book Discussion: Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

March 4 — Making Sport for Our Neighbors. New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren takes us on a tour of the roots of visual satire leading to the New Yorker cartoon, with an excursion into the archive of his own work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

March 19 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Heitor Villa-Lobos. Grant Event. The music of Villa-Lobos, a 20th century Brazilian composer, combines influences of his native folk music and European classical styles. His unique background and musical imagination make him a stand-out among classical composers. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

April 1 — Book Discussion: Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

April 8 — The Medici Grand Dukes: Art and Politics in Renaissance Florence. UVM professor Kelley DiDio considers how, despite scandals and even murder, the Medici Grand Dukes maintained their power for nearly two centuries by giving gifts of art by the great Florentine masters to kings, popes, and emperors. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

May 6 — Calvin Coolidge: More Than Two Words. Drawing from Coolidge’s letters, speeches, and autobiography, Jim Cooke brings Coolidge to life and helps us understand why Will Rogers said, “Mr. Coolidge has more subtle humor than almost any public man I ever met.”A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

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